In the spring of 1990, David Lynch and Mark Frost’s ABC series Twin Peaks made the question of who killed Laura Palmer the talk of the water cooler every Friday morning—or, for those of us who were just 14, the talk of homeroom. (The query was soon joined by discussions of who shot Agent Cooper, what happened to Josie, and whether it was really plausible that Icelanders were so excited about vacation property in the Pacific Northwest.) While the show was set north of Spokane, much of it was filmed in the greater Seattle area, with the hills, woods, waterfalls, diners, and lumber offices around Snoqualmie and North Bend playing starring roles. Twenty-five years later, many of those spots still welcome fans old and new, enticing them with photo ops and cherry pie specials.

Used as the exterior for the fictional Great Northern Hotel*, the Salish Lodge seemed a little too classy to lure guests with its TV connection. But with interest growing in a Showtime reboot next summer (after the new episodes were announced last October, tickets for this summer’s weekend-long Twin Peaks Festival sold out almost immediately), the luxury spa perched over Snoqualmie Falls 30 minutes east of Seattle is embracing its role on the show. The price of its new Great Northern Escape package (starting at $279–459, depending on the night) reminds you that you’re at a luxe spa resort, not the mere “clean place, reasonably priced” sought by Agent Cooper on the show, but it does come with cherry pie and “damn fine coffee” for two in the Attic, a $15 Amazon gift card (which the hotel notes you could use to stream the show), a map of local shooting locations (see below), and two Dale Cooper gin cocktails. While you drink them, you might discuss Cooper portrayer Kyle MacLachlan’s Washington roots and Walla Walla–area wine label, or when, if ever, Agent Cooper ever took a drink on the show. (Did he have a sip of that traveling judge’s crazy punch?)

The gift shop also offers Twin Peaks souvenirs: a range of prints, a coffee mug, cherry pie filling, and other items. Not all of them nail the aesthetic or spirit of the show (Twin Peaks owls should be creepy like on the button set, not cutesy like on the art print), but they’d still make nice gifts for the zealot in your life.

The true test of any hotel, of course, according to Agent Cooper, is that morning cup of coffee. We’ll have to get back to you on that one.

*Alas, guests can’t stay in Agent Cooper’s room or tour Ben Horne’s office at the Salish Lodge. The interiors for the Great Northern were initially shot at Poulsbo, Washington’s Kiana Lodge (along with several outdoor scenes at the Packard house, including the beach where Laura Palmer’s body washed up, wrapped in plastic), and then filmed on soundstages in LA.

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