0416 cyberdom p0elr6

She calls herself a “humiliatrix,” but, really, she’s a multimedia entrepreneur. Ceara Lynch, a 29-year-old Portlander, has garnered international attention—from an episode of popular podcast Love + Radio to British gossip flagship Daily Mail to many websites you wouldn’t want to browse on a work computer—for her thriving, self-made business. Which, true to this century’s newfangled ideas of intimacy, involves catering to the tastes of (mostly) men who enjoy getting bossed around, verbally abused, and emotionally crushed—all in her digital dungeon.

Sooo… how do you make money as a “cyber dom”?

There’s this whole world out there. I have lots of international clients in Europe, UK, Canada, Australia. My clients can pay to stream my videos. It’s $40 a month. I won’t give you an exact number, but I’m making six figures a year. I own a couple of houses. I paid my way through college. I travel a lot.

How did you get started?

I was 17 and living in Japan as an exchange student. No one spoke English, so I sought refuge online. I started talking to this one guy, on a totally normal kind of channel, and it became pretty clear he was kind of a perv. I was intrigued and disgusted at the same time. But being online offered me a safe distance at which to explore. Once I started looking around, there was clearly a market.

What’s your secret?

I use Twitter, Instagram, and Tumblr to grab people’s attention, and from there link them to my various pay sites. The trick is to constantly update. If you stop updating, the audience will start paying attention to someone else.

Who are your clients?

Primarily men, but I do have one female client who e-mails me a good bit. She requests custom videos for her boyfriend, then they watch them together. I play his bratty little sister who comes into his room and humiliates him about his impending circumcision. I also get males calling me pretending to be their wives. Basically they just want me to punish them for their “bad behavior.”

How much of your online persona is actually you?

Having an alter ego was confusing in my late teens and early 20s. I was still figuring out who I was, while at the same time trying to create a unique voice within this performance-art-type role in the fetish world. I’d wonder how much of it was “me.” As I got older, everything sort of fell into place. In real life, I’m a relaxed, go-with-the-flow type of person, which is a terrible attitude to have as a dominatrix.

Does your family know?

I got to where I had to tell them. I was making so much money and I was so young: I was paying for my own nice apartment, driving a nice car. I had told them I was working at Starbucks—it just didn’t add up. My dad was amazed and intrigued. Once he realized I was totally in control of the situation, he was like, “Wow, you’re a genius.” He tells all his friends.

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