First teased two years ago, Bay Point Landing—an upscale RV park in Coos Bay, Oregon—is closing in on an official opening in spring 2019.

On a spit of reclaimed land along Coos Bay, a high-design RV park teased for almost two years is nearing completion. Once envisioned as the Camps at Coos Bay Lagoon and now known as Bay Point Landing, the former lumber mill site will offer “Luxury RV Sites + Cabins” as soon as early spring 2019—once construction wraps up on buildings housing a pool, kid play zone, gym, and store. In the area? You can visit Bay Point now; parts of the park are already open for business—including, for those who don’t tow their own trailer, two bayside Airstreams and some cabins.

Unlike some plush destinations farther north, Coos Bay doesn't often make the lists of coastal must-visits. (The city's lack of an actual oceanfront detracting, perhaps, from its touristic appeal.) Will Bay Point Landing, once complete, succeed in drawing more dune-bound traffic? We were in the area recently, and decided to check out the progress.

The International, the larger of Bay Point Landing’s two Airstreams, sleeps four.

First thought: the property's “luxury” branding might be a stretch, but as of late December, there’s certainly minor glamping to be had inside the Airstreams, with Wi-Fi and a flat-screen cable TV in the queen bedroom and another in the kitchen, where the table drops down and the couch extends to form two additional sleeping berths, bedding provided. You can enjoy a fairly roomy WC and a hot shower without leaving the trailer, and an extendable awning outside offers a bit of shade on the treeless spit. The relatively calm Coos River bay, just steps from the trailers and cabins, offers some mini-waves and a view of the North Spit. There’s even a bit of sand to walk on when the tide is out.

One of Bay Point Landing’s Kamp Haus cottages, which sleep two

In addition to the Airstreams, a few of Bay Point Landing’s 11 light-filled, two-person, 8-by-30-foot Kamp Haus cottages, each decked out in sleek grays and blacks with mod wood furnishings and a covered porch, are already available to rent. Still under construction: six angled-roof Wedge cottages, measuring a roomier 10-by-40 feet and set to sleep four people each, with a king bed in the back room and a queen pullout in the front. The one building already completed on the property might be the most important—housing the bathrooms, showers, and laundry. A small kids’ play structure, along with bocce and horseshoe courts, sit right next to it, along with a fish-cleaning station.

The “baby” burger, fries, and Oreo shake at the Bay Burger Inn

While the nearest dining option is a Dairy Queen, Coos Bay’s nearby Empire neighborhood is home to sushi joint Tokyo Bistro, killer sourdough at Empire Bakery, Luigi’s Italian Sandwiches, and old-school shake shack Bay Burger Inn, plus the handful of eateries at the Three Rivers Casino. Or head south from Bay Point Landing and cross the bridge to Charleston for loads of crab-centric cafés and fish-and-chips spots, from the higher-end Portside to the parking-lot hut Monkey Business. With commercial crabbing season finally underway, expect Charleston’s family-run roaster Bayside Coffee & Tea, a stop on the Wild Rivers Coast Food Trail, to be a little more bustling. (Keep following the Cape Arago Highway through Charleston to the grand gardens at Shore Acres State Park and wildlife viewpoint at Simpson Reef.)

Right now, staying at the Bay Point Landing means overnighting in a construction zone: heavy trucks, back-up beeps, and half-finished buildings that remind guests of the amenities not yet on offer. The office, currently housed in one of the Kamp Haus cottages, has board games to check out, as well as bocce sets and horseshoes to take to the lawn courts next to the playground. And winter guests won’t mind what might be the spit’s main drawback come summer: its total lack of shade.

The pool building at Bay Point Landing, still under construction in December 2018.

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