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When you wander through the halls of Terwilliger Plaza, you could see a Gauguin or an impressionist painting; a piece from the glass arts or the Baroque period. That’s because the members don’t just love art – they’re surrounded by it. With over 1,000 pieces in the permanent collection, art is in the halls and on the walls, something that inspires members but also brings them together. “It’s a big place,” said Barbara Geiger, member of the Artworks Committee. "We get to know each other through the art.”


With three rotating galleries, openings, lectures and more, there are plenty of opportunities for members to appreciate the arts or create pieces themselves. Some have rediscovered a lost passion; others have taken a new skill and turned it into creative expression. And all of them are welcome to show their work at Terwilliger Plaza. From budding painters to seasoned fiber artists, Terwilliger Plaza showcases work from the members in two of its three galleries every month. On March 16th, Ruth Mendelsohn will share her Lenox Judaica Collection and on March 31st, Roger Hallin will have a solo show of watercolors, acrylics, prints and drawings. Each will feature an opening and talk with the collector and artist, something that’s really popular in the community. And the third gallery, in conjunction with The Geezer Gallery, will feature “Tribute to Oregon,” an exhibit of wintry landscapes. “Art is interwoven,” said Judy McNally, member and part of the Artworks Committee. “It’s engrained in our lives here.

And part of that life includes curating the galleries and maintaining the permanent collection, something the Artworks Committee enjoys. Since 2001, this group of volunteers with artistic backgrounds makes sure that the art is as vibrant and diverse as the members themselves. Lovers of literature, lectures and music will feel at home with the Saturday Morning Breakfast Forum, Friday Night Concert Series and more. March includes lectures on everything from traffic and housing problems in Portland to the architectural legacy of John Yeon to talks from mayoral candidates Sean Davis, David Schor and Jules Bailey. On the music side, Terwilliger Plaza hosts jazz and classical, flute and cello, piano and swing. 


From halls and walls to auditoriums and galleries, Terwilliger Plaza is more than a place to live – it’s a place for members to express themselves in vibrant, living color. It’s also a great way to connect to each other and the world. “I think it’s very stimulating for the people who live here,” said Barbara. “It enhances our way of life.”

Learn more and watch the Arts Video at www.terwilligerplaza.com.

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